BME Women Shun Politicians’ Scaremongering Over Immigration

by | Dec 24, 2018 | News | 0 comments

What do women think? A view from Ealing/Hounslow

By Sukhwant Dhaliwal via Mapping Immigration Controversy

A research project mapping the unfolding controversy of Home Office immigration campaigns.

As the Labour Party’s Pink Bus gets on its merry way, there is growing speculation about how women will vote at the General Election and what we know about their main concerns. A poll conducted by TNS BMRB for BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour found that immigration was number 4 in the top 5 concerns for the women that were polled (it was number 3 of the top five concerns for men). A little more insight is provided by extracts from a focus group session they conducted with six women from Bexley Heath in south-east London. One gets the sense that they view immigration as a problem but, other than a passing reference to border controls and the impact of global elites on London’s house prices, there is little detail about what specifically or how immigration concerns them. In fact some of the interviewees in our research suggested that references to immigration are more of a proxy for other grievances, particularly concerns about the economy, access to housing and welfare support. And our own surveys have found, it’s difficult to capture, statistically, the multiple things that are meant when people say they are concerned about immigration.

Moreover, renewed debates about intersectionality should act as a timely reminder that women do not speak with one voice and that the increasing hardline on immigration could be understood differently by women depending on the way that they experience multiple axes of power at any one time. It could be the case that the women that most acutely feel the impact of the Home Office’s immigration campaigns are from ethnic minorities and particularly (but not only) those subject to immigration controls. It is not clear how many of the Bexley Heath focus group participants were from minority communities but we worked closely with our west London community partners, Southall Black Sisters, to facilitate two focus groups with a total of 15 women of Asian, African, and Caribbean descent. The two groups comprised a mix of British nationals, those that have been resident in Britain for a considerable period of time, those that recently gained leave to remain in the UK, and also a number of women that are awaiting news of applications or appeals. Their comments offer new insights into the ways in which women might be concerned about immigration and also how this may feature for women as an electoral issue.

Read the full article here “What do women think? A view from Ealing/Hounslow”

The Mapping Immigration Controversy team presented their research on 2nd March 2015, with Pragna Patel as the main speaker at the Westminster Briefing meeting. Follow https://twitter.com/MICresearch and hashtage #micresearch for highlights from the briefing.

To read about the Westminster Briefing meeting click here [Migrants Rights Net] Researchers report that ‘Go Home Vans’ campaign increased public anxiety about immigration rather than reduced it

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